The Green Mountain State, the second largest in New England, is also one of the most picturesque. It is known for quaint small towns, dairy farms, mountain and forest scenery that can be breathtaking in any season and a rational and progressive approach to life. Maintaining the unique character of the state continues to be a priority and visiting offers a singular and rewarding experience to the traveler.

Click here to open the guide to Vermont!




At the Northern-most tip of Cape Ann lies the quaint town of Rockport. Settled in 1690, Rockport quickly became a leader in granite cutting and many of these outcrops can be seen today at various quarries. A host of interesting shops and galleries surround Rockport’s charming harbor, which is still home to an active fishing fleet. Rockport is one of the country’s oldest artist colonies, and boasts some of the most widely painted seaside landscapes in the world, including the coastal shack known as Motif #1. Approximate one hour drive from Boston.

Click here to open the guide to Rockport!

Provincetown, Cape Cod


It doesn’t take long to discover why Provincetown is so popular. You’ll find miles of warm –water beaches, fresh-caught seafood, hiking and biking trails and challenging golf courses. All this in a peninsula that’s known for its distinctive architectural style of gable-roofed houses, their shingles weathered to a soft gray.

Click here to open the guide to Provincetown, Cape Cod!



   Plimoth Plantation Recreates World Of The Pilgrims

On December 21, 1620, 102 men, women and children arrived on the Mayflower to found the first permanent European settlement north of Virginia. Although plagued by exposure, cold, hunger and disease during the terrible first winter, the colony was firmly established by the next year. Plymouth Rock lies under an imposing granite colonnade, marking the traditional place of landing. Plymouth now combines a summer resort, beaches, a harbor full of pleasure craft, an active fishing town and a remarkable series of restorations of the original town.

Click here to open the guide to Plymouth!


Ogunquit, Maine


Ogunquit, a quaint small village offers something for everyone with boutiques, galleries, antique shops, scenic walks, renowned restaurants, a fabulous beach and more. Here Maine’s stern and rock-bound coast becomes a sunny strand – a great white beach stretching three miles, with gentle (though sometimes chilly) surf. The Ogunquit public beach is one of the finest on the Atlantic. Marine views, with the picturesque little harbor of Perkins Cove, have attracted a substantial art colony. The village carries an artsy flare.

Click here to open the guide to Ogunquit!


North Shore

  north shore

The 30 miles of rocky coastline north of Boston are punctuated with long sandy beaches, rugged fishing ports, and sparkling sailing harbors. Nautical lore and the ghosts of the witches past offer fascinating glimpses into the region’s rich history.

Click here to open the guide to North Shore!



  nantucket 1

Nantucket is a popular resort and destination. It offers charming cobblestone streets lined with beautiful old houses, 82 miles of lovely beaches, wonderful restaurants and the perfect setting for a variety of activities such as sunbathing, biking, tennis, golf, windsurfing, sport-fishing, shopping and more. The island was the world’s greatest whaling port from the late 17th century until the early 1800’s and has maintained much of its 17th- to 19th-century character.

Click here to open the guide to Nantucket!